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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Proteolysis - induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning found in the catalog.

Proteolysis - induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning

Catherine Stanton

Proteolysis - induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning

by Catherine Stanton

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  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Dorset Institute in [Poole] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementCatherine Stanton.
ContributionsDorset Institute., Agriculture and Food Research Council.
The Physical Object
Pagination278p. ;
Number of Pages278
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13865924M

The combined effects of aging and low temperature, long time heating (LTLT) on meat toughness were investigated. Pork loins were heated at 53 or 58 °C for up to 20 h, and shear force values. Start studying Principles of Meat Science: Muscle Degradation, Antemortem, and Postmortem Effects on Meat Quality (Lecture 5 Notes). Learn vocabulary, terms, and .

Its effect on the course of the proteolysis process was assessed by monitoring changes in proportions of tissue proteins during day process of meat ageing. Special attention was focused on changes in native titin (T1) share and products of its degradation (proteins of molecular weight (m.w.) of and kDa), α-actinin and protein of POSTMORTEM PROTEOLYSIS, IONIC STRENGTH, AND THE RESOLUTION OF RIGOR I. Rigor and its resolution A. The rigor bond 1. ATP consumed by non-contractile activity of A-M-ATPase and ion pumps. 2. Irreversible crosslinking of actin and myosin occurs. 3. Muscle becomes inextensible (rigor). B. Ultrastructural changes 1. Z-Line (most obvious change). a.

Mechanical strain or stretch of collagen has been shown to be protective of fibrils against both thermal and enzymatic degradation. The details of this mechanochemical relationship could change our understanding of load-bearing tissue formation, growth, maintenance, and disease in vertebrate animals. However, extracting a quantitative relationship between strain and the rate of enzymatic. Low-frequency and high-power ultrasound (40 kHz, 1, W) was tested for its effects on the characteristics of intramuscular heat-insoluble collagen and meat quality and textural properties of beef semitendinosus muscle. Meat steaks ( × ×  cm, ± 5 g) were sonicated 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min, respectively. Characteristics changes of collagen.


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Proteolysis - induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning by Catherine Stanton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Proteolysis-induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning. Perimysial and endomysial collagens were solubilized to a small extent during conditioning and residual insoluble collagens in both connective tissue domains were damaged by proteolytic processing. Yields of soluble perimysial material from unconditioned muscles were.

Proteolysis-induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning observed on analysis of insoluble endomysial fractions after CNBr-digestion were derived from types I and III collagen. Changes observed on the peptide maps, evident as the appearanceo f a number of new bandsf rom conditioned samples,a ppearedt o be muscle specific.

Proteolysis - induced changes in meat collagen during conditioning. Perimysial and endomysial collagens\ud were solubilized to a small extent during conditioning and residual insoluble collagens in both connective tissue domains were damaged by proteolytic processing.

% Type III collagen decreased on conditioning,\ud indicating that Author: Catherine Stanton. The lysosomal proteases capable of cleaving native insoluble collagen to soluble fragments are cathepsins B, L and N (Etherington, ; Locnikar et al., ), but little evidence is available to show the direct effect of such enzymes Connective tissue changes during conditioning 26 l on collagens in conditioned by:   Meat Science 27 () The Effects of Conditioning on Meat Collagen: Part Evidence for Proteolytic Damage to Endomysial Collagen after Conditioning Catherine Stanton* & Nicholas Light Department of Food and Catering Management, Dorset Institute, Poole, Dorset BHI2 5BB, UK (Received 23 February ; revised version received 27 April ; accepted 26 May ) A Cited by: The overall effect of postmortem proteolysis on cooked meat texture can be influenced by the initial composition of the muscle (fiber type, connective tissue amount and solubility, fat and moisture content) and the ultimate pH of the muscle and subsequent temperature during aging (Gruber et.

Heat‐induced alteration in the 3‐dimensional structure of meat proteins has been shown to cause many of the quality changes in meat, including those of color (Suman and Joseph ), tenderness (Christensen and others ), and gelation (Sun and Holley ).

Yet, much about the impact of heat on meat protein remains to be explored at the. During refrigerated conditioning, however, the WB shear force values increased significantly despite irradiation (P collagen solubilized from muscle, protein aggregation induced by carbonylation of troponin T (at 7 days of storage) and further cross-linking of myosin heavy chain (MHC) (at   Calpain 3 binds with titin at N2 or M-line region [,] which is a known site linked with proteolysis during meat tenderization.

The binding of calpain 3 with titin protects it from auto-degradation and its removal from titin results in rapid autolysis. Since the term “aging” has often been confused with physiological aging, “conditioning” is a more preferred term (Penny ) and will be used in this chapter to denote the holding of carcasses or meat cuts at various temperatures above freezing to cause improvements in meat quality.

The proteolytic changes which occur in the longissimus dorsi muscles of beef carcasses during 30 days' aging at 2°C give rise to a mean increase of nonprotein nitrogen of mM/g meat, representing a degradation of % of the meat protein. The tenderizing and proteolysis which occur during aging are not related, for differences in the rates.

Changes in caspase activity during the postmortem conditioning period and its relationship to shear force in porcine longissimus muscle.

Journal of Animal Scie – Kerth, CR, Miller, MF, Ramsey, CB Postmortem proteolysis in skeletal muscle and factors affecting this process were examined in pork, lamb and beef longissimus muscles (LM) to determine the cause of differences in meat tenderness.

Catherine Stanton, Nicholas Light, The effects of conditioning on meat collagen: Part 3—Evidence for proteolytic damage to endomysial collagen after conditioning, Meat Science, /(90), 27, 1, (), ().

Bromelain ( mg protease/ mg meat protein) was found to be more active against collagen proteins and less active toward myofibrillar proteins than papain ( mg/ mg protein) or.

meat causes proteolysis in IMCT, which increases the amount of collagen that can easily be solubilised from it (Stanton & Light, ). This significantly reduces the strength of perimysium in raw meat (Lewis et al., ).

There have been a large number of studies in the last dec-ade which reiterate that ageing decreases the structural in. The process has been shown to involve the removal of degraded collagen (a form of collagen in which the fibrillar structure has disintegrated and which has been named ‘progelatin’ 2) produced.

The objective of the study was to investigate in vitro degradation of myofibrils by caspase-3 or Myofibrillar proteins prepared from beef skeletal muscle were incubated with caspase-3 or -6 at 30 °C for 2 or 12 h, and subsequently, protein degradation was detected.

Results showed that caspase-3 and -6 reproduced the degradation patterns of titin and nebulin observed during normal. Figure 2A lanes 3–5 show that for short incubation times, MMP-9 did not result in productive proteolysis of collagen type-II. Hence the molecular weight of collagen type-II fragments did not change in the earlier stages of the collagenolytic reaction in.

Catherine Stanton and Nicholas Light, The effects of conditioning on meat collagen: Part 1—Evidence for gross in situ proteolysis, Meat Science, 21, 4, (), (). Crossref D. BURSON and M. HUNT, Proportion of Collagen Types I and III in Four Bovine Muscles Differing in Tenderness, Journal of Food Science, 51, 1, (), ().

The proteolytic changes which occur in the longissimus dorsi muscles of beef carcasses during 30 days' aging at 2°C give rise to a mean increase of nonprotein nitrogen of mM/g meat. Physicochemical Changes during Postmortem Aging.

The postmortem storage and processing conditions affect the flavor and tenderness of the meat (Perry, ), and are important for improving the final quality of the product (Honkavaara et al., ).Animal slaughtering results in an interruption in the cell control systems, and enzymes are produced that start attacking different cell.

Proteolysis is essential for numerous developmental and physiological processes (Lopez-Otin and Bond ).However, deregulation of proteolytic activity underlies many pathological conditions, including cancer (Affara et al.

).The first association between proteases and cancer was reported in when Albert Fischer proposed that the proteolytic activity of cancer cells could be.